Author Topic: The VULCAN effect  (Read 5951 times)

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Offline Vulcanatic

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The VULCAN effect
« on: October 16, 2015, 08:07:11 PM »
I'd turned up for the 'Wales Air Show' this year at Swansea bay, after nagging the organisers mercilessly for months to secure VULCAN, I thought it was the least I could do.  It's a good theatre for an air show as Swansea Bay is 4 miles long so no-one feels crammed in.

There was one thing I was interested in at the show, XH558, nothing else much mattered although I will confess to enjoying the fantastic display the Eurofighter Typhoon put on.

Whilst I was eagerly awaiting the arrival of XH558, I got talking to an elderly couple who were also there mainly to see VULCAN, the display happened, everyone was appreciative of the pilot's close passes & 'bonus' flypast.  Immediately after the display had ended I started to speak with this couple again.  The old lady was chuckling to herself, she told me how she wasn't really watching the plane, she was watching people's reaction to it, particularly the kids.  She pointed to a young family stood 15 feet away, "See that young boy," she pointed at a lad of perhaps 6 or 7 years old, "I watched his face as the Vulcan came over first time and his mouth fell open, when the plane came back around and he went into that climb full throttle the boys jaw was nearly on the pavement. While we were watching her flying off I could see him tugging on his father's sleeve, saying 'Dad I was thinking perhaps I'll be an RAF man when I get older' "

I think I was about the same age when I first saw Vulcan at one of the Battle of Britain displays at RAF St Athan, it shows the inspirational effect XH558 still has and how much greater this must have been when VULCAN was new technology.

As good as some of the other high octane displays were during the day I didn't witness the same dreamy expression on peoples faces that had been there when XH558 sang for us.

Does anyone have any similar remembrances?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIAKLqIxZC0
Random Youtube clip of Wales Air Show by 'Drona'
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 09:35:17 PM by Vulcanatic »
Chris

Offline eddief

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2015, 11:43:20 PM »
Yes, it rings bells..!

When I was a kid, I lived in Redbridge (NE London) and we were slap bang in the middle of the extended centreline for the Mall.

As a result, twice a year we were treated to low-level flypasts of all kinds of aircraft.  Wave after relentless wave of Lightnings, Buccaneers, Phantoms, Victors, VC10s and erm... oh, a couple of formations of Vulcans.

There is no question that this spectable motivated me to become the person I now (still find myself surprised) to be, to be doing the things I am & to have experienced the things I have.

Happy Days...  :)

If anyone has pictures of these flypasts then please do share them with me - pretty please!
985 posts on last forum - so I get the \'hallowed 1000\' for just 15 on this one (yippee!)

Offline Rover3500

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2015, 10:43:18 AM »
I remember being dragged along to Finningley  as a rather bored small boy by my brother  back in the days of RAF Vulcan operation. Nothing compared to the Vulcan that day it made it's mark on me and I still remember the display  like it was yesterday .
I literally couldn't believe what I was seeing it was just fantastic!. The smoke from using copious amounts of full power, noise, control it was in a class of it's own.  I  never forgot that day and have wanted to work in Engineering ever since.

I guess that's part of the reason  why i'd like XH558 to use every last scrap of airframe and engine life although that possibility  has slipped away now it seems.

I want as many people today to witness what I did...the chance to be inspired, to see what this country could do before we lost our nerve. Yes it's potentially  dangerous as it always has been  and an accident could happen but it's worth the risk. 
We could seek to eliminate all risk from or lives (as we so often do)  ...but would our lives still be worth living ?

 

Offline Vulcanatic

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2015, 01:22:35 PM »
I remember being dragged along to Finningley  as a rather bored small boy by my brother  back in the days of RAF Vulcan operation. Nothing compared to the Vulcan that day it made it's mark on me and I still remember the display  like it was yesterday .
I literally couldn't believe what I was seeing it was just fantastic!. The smoke from using copious amounts of full power, noise, control it was in a class of it's own.  I  never forgot that day and have wanted to work in Engineering ever since.

I guess that's part of the reason  why i'd like XH558 to use every last scrap of airframe and engine life although that possibility  has slipped away now it seems.

I want as many people today to witness what I did...the chance to be inspired, to see what this country could do before we lost our nerve. Yes it's potentially  dangerous as it always has been  and an accident could happen but it's worth the risk. 
We could seek to eliminate all risk from or lives (as we so often do)  ...but would our lives still be worth living ?

I think that I can say without fear of contradiction, in these forums at least, that during the airworthy lifetime of VULCAN, no matter how impressive the aircraft surrounding it at shows / displays, VULCAN was always the undisputed superstar of the show so to see them in isolation, e.g. flying between bases or on sorties has always been a treat beyond words.

Having watched our stunning XH558 pass in close alongside the (wrong) Severn Bridge on Sunday following the M48 I had wondered how many RTA's VULCAN might have inadvertently contributed to during the Farewell Tour.

There is a quote I've heard but can't assign to it's originator that went something along the lines of; "During mankind's history, of all his achievements, the greatest by far have always been those driven by war." I think that this is a truism, of which the AVRO VULCAN is a spectacularly good example.

I am, in truth, still unable to accept that VULCAN will NEVER fly again.  I'd always hoped that some day we would see Concorde in the skies again, I'm not holding my breath but I think it will happen eventually. VULCAN in the skies of Great Britain again, I think that it MUST happen, albeit decades down the line and beyond the allotted span of many of us.  Finding the finance to make this next miracle happen could, in itself, take decades.
Chris

Offline ascot5046

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2015, 01:57:15 PM »
QUOTE: I want as many people today to witness what I did...the chance to be inspired, to see what this country could do before we lost our nerve. Yes it's potentially  dangerous as it always has been  and an accident could happen but it's worth the risk. 
We could seek to eliminate all risk from or lives (as we so often do)  ...but would our lives still be worth living ?


I wonder if the Aircrew would agree on the above :-\

Offline Mayfly

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2015, 01:59:50 PM »
As a young girl I remember playing on the lawn and saw 3 aircraft in line astern very high, asking my elder brother what they were he said 'Vulcans'.

I just thought WOW!

I can remember it as plain as day and it was one of the earliest indicators that wanted to join the RAF. Little did I know I would end up marring a Vulcan pilot.

Offline Paddy Langdown

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2015, 02:16:46 PM »

I always wanted to fly Spitfires until I went to Farnborough & saw the Roly Falk Vulcan Barrel Roll &, a couple of years later saw the Vulcan do a LABS
manoeuvre. That was the year I discovered the RAF had no more Spitfires so I said I'll have one of those instead!

Strange, isn't it, my wife married a Vulcan pilot too!

Offline Paddy Langdown

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2015, 02:18:35 PM »

I always wanted to fly Spitfires until I went to Farnborough & saw the Roly Falk Vulcan Barrel Roll &, a couple of years later saw the Vulcan do a LABS
manoeuvre. That was the year I discovered the RAF had no more Spitfires so I said I'll have one of those instead!

Strange, isn't it, my wife married a Vulcan pilot too!

I forgot - please give my regards to DT!

Offline Vulcanatic

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2015, 04:56:42 PM »

I always wanted to fly Spitfires until I went to Farnborough & saw the Roly Falk Vulcan Barrel Roll &, a couple of years later saw the Vulcan do a LABS
manoeuvre. That was the year I discovered the RAF had no more Spitfires so I said I'll have one of those instead!

Strange, isn't it, my wife married a Vulcan pilot too!

My humble thanks to you for your service.
I can't conceive of a more desirable career choice than VULCAN Pilot, almost an astronaut but without all of that floating about nonsense!  :)
Chris

Offline Paddy Langdown

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2015, 05:18:50 PM »

I always wanted to fly Spitfires until I went to Farnborough & saw the Roly Falk Vulcan Barrel Roll &, a couple of years later saw the Vulcan do a LABS
manoeuvre. That was the year I discovered the RAF had no more Spitfires so I said I'll have one of those instead!

Strange, isn't it, my wife married a Vulcan pilot too!

My humble thanks to you for your service.
I can't conceive of a more desirable career choice than VULCAN Pilot, almost an astronaut but without all of that floating about nonsense!  :)

And being paid for it! Sheer Heaven!!

Offline Vulcanatic

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2015, 08:41:25 PM »

I always wanted to fly Spitfires until I went to Farnborough & saw the Roly Falk Vulcan Barrel Roll &, a couple of years later saw the Vulcan do a LABS
manoeuvre. That was the year I discovered the RAF had no more Spitfires so I said I'll have one of those instead!

Strange, isn't it, my wife married a Vulcan pilot too!

My humble thanks to you for your service.
I can't conceive of a more desirable career choice than VULCAN Pilot, almost an astronaut but without all of that floating about nonsense!  :)

And being paid for it! Sheer Heaven!!

Like winning the lottery every day!
Chris

Offline Rover3500

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Re: The VULCAN effect
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2015, 11:20:46 PM »
QUOTE: I want as many people today to witness what I did...the chance to be inspired, to see what this country could do before we lost our nerve. Yes it's potentially  dangerous as it always has been  and an accident could happen but it's worth the risk. 
We could seek to eliminate all risk from or lives (as we so often do)  ...but would our lives still be worth living ?


I wonder if the Aircrew would agree on the above :-\

I believe that the aircrew would  see the risks in context - an airframe that is within the Fatigue index  limits set by fatigue testing is recognised  to be safe to the Civil Aviation Authority  providing that no significant  corrosion has  occurred and inspections are made.
There is no de-rate on permitted airframe life  for aircraft age I am aware of.  Airframes it seem do not 'age' or degrade with time  (unless corrosion occurs,)  but just wear out .

Vulcan XH558 has covered '10% more flying hours than any other Vulcan' which seems to have been used as a justification for ending flight. The current flying hours are 7386 (logged in 2007) +  approx. 200 hrs since return to flight which is a total of  7586 hrs.

This means that the next longest serving Vulcan has 10% less or 6827 HRS.

So when XH558  returned to flight in 2008 it could be said the aircraft then  had  covered over  '8% more flying hours than any other Vulcan'.  Which puts the 10% figure in perspective if indeed it is significant.