Author Topic: Flying the Vulcan!  (Read 21934 times)

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Offline speedy

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2010, 01:00:35 PM »
I was reading a night or two ago about one of the Op. Corp. Vulcans being short of engine life for the trip back to the UK, and they took her into the hanger and removed, replaced and tested a pair of engines in six hours.  Apparently they were not only tweeked to 103%, but tested up to 106% as I guess they need some safety margin at the top end.  A few percent isn't much, mind you.  In the land of steamy things, the boilers are usually hydraulically tested to 200% of working pressure!  A reason given for the need to use 103% for Black Buck was not only the overload of about 2 1/2 tons, but also the fact that the heat at Ascension means the air is less dense.  Makes sense to me, although it might just be speculation....
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Guest »
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Offline nickwilcock

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2010, 08:23:57 PM »
For the 300s, 107% was actually the 'overswing' limit (following rapid throttle movement), whereas 103% was the normal (de-rate removed) max limit, if I recall correctly.

I've just sent a little more dosh to the cause - hopefully we'll hear the 200-ser 'howwwwwwwwwooooollll' again next year... 8-)
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Guest »

Offline bovril

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2010, 08:53:40 PM »
i think im correct, but sure to be put right.. the 300 was no less fragile.. they were de-rated so that all vulcans responded the same.. and running them at lower power would improve life (as with any engine) and that they  were returned to max power for black buck to allow them to fly  with max bomb load and max fuel weight at altitude.
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Offline Pujgnie

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2012, 08:46:15 PM »
Colston Nichols (ex 558 and Vulcan jockey and member of TB) is sending me a written account of a major Hydraulic Failure on one of his sortees in a Vulcan. He would like me to foward it for possible inclusion in the next Vulcan Magazine.

Cols is old school, and NOT into computers - and therefore is reliant on telephonic updates from moi. He has sent me £20 cash for donation to our lady into the bargain.

To whom - and where, do I later foward this inclusion to ?

Ta
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Guest »
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Offline Gully

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #19 on: August 06, 2013, 02:14:49 PM »
Quote from: "Pujgnie"
Colston Nichols (ex 558 and Vulcan jockey and member of TB) is sending me a written account of a major Hydraulic Failure on one of his sortees in a Vulcan. He would like me to foward it for possible inclusion in the next Vulcan Magazine.

Cols is old school, and NOT into computers - and therefore is reliant on telephonic updates from moi. He has sent me £20 cash for donation to our lady into the bargain.

To whom - and where, do I later foward this inclusion to ?

Ta

Coming to this rather late, but Lee Broadbent is your man if you've not sorted it already: lee.broadbent@vulcantotheskyclub.co.uk

Gully
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Guest »
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Offline John LeBrun

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2013, 01:52:37 PM »
The early 300 series engines were very slow to accelerate which in fact caused a Vulcan to crash at Scampton (damaging the officers' bog in the air traffic control tower with its wing tip) in the early 60s.  The 103% mentioned was an RPM value.  At 103% the thrust was much more than a 3% increase.  RPM in a jet engine was and probably still shown, in percentage of maximum but the thrust output is not linear.  For example in the Vulcan at 85% RPM the thrust was less than 50% of maximum.  The rate of increase in the last 10% RPM was way beyond 10% of thrust creating this so called umph!!! 

Offline Paddy Langdown

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Re: Flying the Vulcan!
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2013, 06:11:36 PM »

I remember the name, John Lebrun, I think from Waddington days but my memory is not what it was. That goes for a lot of other bits as well but I won't list them!