Author Topic: Fuel leak  (Read 4142 times)

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Offline PaulH2015

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Fuel leak
« on: September 16, 2015, 08:48:03 AM »
Thanks for the newsletter info about last weekends happenings, as someone with two 40-year-old classic cars it's always interesting to hear techie stuff like this.

I had already been wondering just how the fuel indication system worked on the Vulcan.  I can't imagine a float as typically used on cars, especially with 14 tanks.  It is pressure?  Or volume used with the gauges having been programmed with the volume loaded?  Or something else?

Offline StAthan lecky

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Re: Fuel leak
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2015, 08:58:44 AM »
The fuel is measured by "Capacitance",various sized capacitors are fitted in the tanks and the results are added up to give fuel levels,it used to be my job when I was in the RAF at St Athan to connect them back up after the tanks had been refitted during Major servicing of Vulcans.

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Offline Fonseca

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Re: Fuel leak
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2015, 12:09:05 PM »
Here is a shot of the capacitance bands rolled up and bagged. When unfurled the strips are attached vertically inside the tank. Contact with the fuel produces the varying electrical signals used to determine fuel level...  :)

"I've never flown an aircraft yet when I didn't feel a bit short of wing - except the Vulcan".

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Offline djrose007

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Re: Fuel leak
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2015, 08:35:44 AM »
The ground crew have done an outstanding job in testing and determining if any problem existed last week. They are to be congratulated and thanks for their diligence and they should know how much we appreciated it.
Showed the spirit that kept these aircraft, and all aircraft in the RAF, in top condition during their service.
Well done Taff and your merry men, and thank you.
David J Rose Mem. No. 17334
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Offline PaulH2015

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Re: Fuel leak
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2015, 09:57:08 AM »
Excellent info from both of you on the measuring.  Funnily enough I considered electrical conductance and capacitance when designing a brake fluid level monitor for my classic cars which have single circuit brake systems and where a fault in the servo can swallow all the fluid in minutes!  In the end I settled for a float system.

Add my thanks to Taff and his engineers, and all the VTTSC people for getting her in the air, and to the flight crew for all the wonderful displays over the years.