Author Topic: Vulcan Engineering assistants  (Read 2938 times)

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Offline Sad Sam

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Vulcan Engineering assistants
« on: March 01, 2016, 11:33:27 PM »
From the News letter.
 
"As Taff and the team begin work to replace one of XH558’s engines with one that has had a new gearbox fitted, it was good to welcome our first two ‘Vulcan Assistants’ who were able to help with the removal of some of the access panels on the aircraft among other jobs yesterday. The team welcomed Jack Pattison and Mark Norfolk, and from their obvious enthusiasm at the end of the day, the experience had been thoroughly enjoyable for them."

Just to fill in a few blanks and dispel some of the rumors and "doom and gloom" type feedback I've read on other forums and social media.

As well as removing the engine doors Jack and Mark carried out the majority of the "zone one" disconnects on Monday.  If you have ever seen the Vulcan with the engine doors open or removed that is all of the pipe work, ducting, control rods and intake make up pieces inside the forward door.  They both carried out all of the work with ample opportunity to get personal mementos of their day out (558 is an old lady, she bites and leaks - sorry about that)  The only part of the zone 1 disconnect they did not complete was the alternator removal, so in the finest traditions of the service we let Mike and Spencer do that today before they got on with the zone 2 disconnects.

So far the feedback has been excellent with all four of the guys saying they would happily come back for more.

To clear up any misunderstanding.  The assistants are not coming in to take over from the "Vulcan Scrubbers" (who are still more than welcome to contact me via pm on here whenever they want to come in) they will be working with the engineering team carrying out whatever task the team has scheduled for that day.  For the next two weeks this means if you come in to the hangar you will be carrying out an engine change on 558.  As far as possible we let you carry out the work in accordance with the service procedures (if it gets too difficult we may take over but the general idea is that you get the experience) you will then sign for the task you have carried out, we will oversign you and we will give you a copy of the paper work and a certificate as mementos.  Once the engine change is complete there will be other scheduled tasks to complete and will do our best to ensure that you have as interesting day as possible.

I look forward to meeting up with the rest of the assistants and hope you all have a great time - I have had for the last 35 years  ;)
« Last Edit: March 02, 2016, 09:10:51 AM by Sad Sam »
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Offline PaulH2015

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Re: Vulcan Engineering assistants
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2016, 10:39:49 AM »
Looking forward with great anticipation to my turn later this month. ;D

Offline PaulH2015

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Re: Vulcan Engineering assistants
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2016, 11:28:51 AM »
I can vouch for Sam's description of a typical day having done mine yesterday - we do all the hands-on stuff, the hosts are there to explain, advise and observe.  Superb experience, I was lubricating the engine throttle controls which may not sound like much, but I never expected to find myself under the flight-desk floor and wedged in under and behind the desk in the rear cabin.  Dropped the engine doors to lubricate in there as well, checked the throttle movement range of No.1 engine that had just been swapped, and a visual inspection over all four engines.  The highlight was sitting in the Captain's seat moving the throttles as part of the movement checks, with Ray talking me through the controls and instruments - the fuel control panel is mind-blowing - including the engine start procedure, and answering loads of questions.  I'd always wondered what the black and yellow hazard striped part was on the top edge of the instrument panel - engine bay fire extinguishers.  I was really lucky, while up there Taff needed the bomb-bay doors to be closed, and the switch happens to be under the Captains elbow...  A full and busy day, superb value for money.